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Film is Dead: Long Live Film!

While shooting a documentary film about the Blasket Islands in South West Ireland I had an opportunity to shoot on film, for the first time in 2 decades. The film focuses on life on the Blasket Islands in the first half of the twentieth century and I wanted to create some imagery that felt it belonged in that era, so chose to shoot stills on Kodak negative film with a Rolleiflex. In the past I was a huge film enthusiast, but as the quality of digital stills and video has improved I’ve become sceptical about the ‘magic’ of film and convinced that just about any ‘look’ can be effectively reproduced through digital capture. Going back to film I was reminded just what a tough medium it is; eeking out 12 precious shots from a roll. In the end I was surprised to find myself seduced by film. Compared to a digital still the film image seems to have a distinctive texture, contrast range and colour response, giving it a ‘painterly’ quality – well worth the effort.

Medium format portrait. Dunquin, Ireland. Photo credit: Yoho Media.

Shot with a Rolleiflex T on Kodak Portra 400. Click here to see the full size image.

Medium format portrait. Dunquin, Ireland. Photo credit: Yoho Media.

Shot on a Canon 5D Mk II with a 50mm F1.2

An actor playing the part of a photographer from the 1950s for a film about the history of the Blasket Islands.
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Shooting medium format in Ireland

Very excited to be shooting film for the first time in a decade, and on a spectacularly beautiful day in South West Ireland. We’re shooting stills and re-enactment scenes for a film about the Blasket Islands for Ireland’s Office of Public Works. In order to produce images that have a strong period feel we’re using 6 x 6 medium format film and a vintage Rolleiflex camera. You can see the results here.

Two planes heading West, which is the direction chosen by the inhabitants when they abandoned the islands in 1953.

Filming the Stones; Standing, not Rolling!

A spectacular day of filming at Stonehenge today – great skies over the Wiltshire landscape.

Stonehenge
Tourists at Stonehenge
Stonehenge
Tourists at Stonehenge
Stonehenge
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‘Photography is over,’ an interview with master image-maker Nick Knight

We had the great privilege to film an interview with photographer and film-maker Nick Knight today, as part of a film about body image, diversity and fashion. Nick, whose incredible images mark him out as one of the world’s top fashion photographers, offered up some provocative insights on the emerging digital era. For him  ‘photography is over’, it died a death at the start of this century to be replaced by modern, digital image-making, a new medium of immense artistic freedom and possibility, which has shaken off the dead hand of ‘truth’ and moved into a fresh, creative space where the visual imagination can run wild and images can be endlessly controlled, manipulated, adjusted and re-invented. It’s new world, in which we’re just scratching the surface, where Nick’s work delivers an inspiring glimpse of the possibilities – see it here.

An interview with photographer Nick Knight. Photo credit: Yoho Media
An interview with photographer Nick Knight. Photo credit: Yoho Media
An interview with photographer Nick Knight. Photo credit: Yoho Media
An interview with photographer Nick Knight. Photo credit: Yoho Media

Sometimes even C02 looks beautiful

After a busy day of filming at Nationwide Building Society in Derby I couldn’t resist this shot of the East Midlands Power Station looking moody and threatening against a chilly winter sunset. The footage, captured in crystal clear 5k is available to buy through our online collections at Nimia.

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